Episode 21 – Is Burglary Always Violent

Episode 21
2018/04/26

From KALB: Bill to remove non-violent, non-sex offenses from habitual offender law voted down.
What does it take to get a bill into your legislature. Who sponsors a bill? How do committees work? How are they split between the parties?
http://www.kalb.com/content/news/Bill-to-remove-non-violent-and-non-sex-offenses-from-habitual-offender-law-voted-down-480075373.html

A big SCOTUS decision in Sessions v. Dimaya ruling that helps our cause. How is it that void-for-vagueness doctrine helps us with our fight in the registry? Do people in the media skew the information to support their agenda; distorting facts
http://thehill.com/regulation/court-battles/383512-supreme-court-invalidates-law-requiring-the-deportation-of?userid=108581
http://www.scotusblog.com/2018/04/opinion-analysis-crime-based-removal-provision-is-unconstitutionally-vague/

Related to the Dimaya story.
And here is talk radio host Mark Levin, who reaches 7M listeners describing the plaintiff incorrectly.

 

https://youtu.be/L7BNrQaf46A?t=6m10s

From Vox.com:
The ability to prosecute and jail people for lying to investigators is, obviously, an incredibly powerful tool of the FBI, US attorneys’ offices, and other aspects of federal law enforcement. it’s also prone to abuse in some fairly obvious ways — especially because it’s perfectly legal for the investigators to lie to you. That’s why standard legal advice is to simply refuse to talk to investigators under any circumstances. “People seem to think that: If I haven’t done anything wrong, then it’s okay for me to talk to the government,” writes defense lawyer David Benowitz, “and that’s just dead wrong.”
https://www.vox.com/2018/4/18/17242766/book-james-comey-hillary-emails-trump-firing-fbi-director

 

2 thoughts to “Episode 21 – Is Burglary Always Violent”

  1. I’m not sure if my last post worked, so I’m leaving this again.

    Would you be able to comment on the Chinese “Social Credit” system. It is ominous (200 million cameras in use) and harsh (restricting people’s travel, internet use, credit, etc). It is both a reminder of our beloved registry system and a frightening thing, with respect to freedom.

    They bill it as a disincentive to bad behavior.

    http://www.wcax.com/content/news/China-to-rank-all-citizens-with-social-credit-score-480717391.html

    https://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/social-credit-system/

    1. Hey SW, sorry – I did see the other one. I for sidetracked with other things and forgot to go back into it to reply.
      What do we do if someone acts outside of norms? If you’re sitting at a restaurant and someone burps loudly, it’s not an accepted activity. You don’t hang out with people that run around holding their package I assume.
      It would seem then that China is taking this to a much greater extreme and putting your face up on billboards if you jwalk. Hilarious.
      And also, don’t we have other similar elemtns of it in our society with our credit scoring system. You can/can’t get a specific job because of it. Or your criminal background, etc.

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